Measuring SES series: Income, need, and living wages

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a post on socio-economic status (SES). SES is usually understood to be a combination of three things: income, education, and occupation. There are multiple reasons why we might ask such as establishing need, making sure that we are reaching the population that needs our services, or making sure…

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Measuring socio-economic status

A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a blog post on gathering race and ethnicity data on a survey or form. One of my readers commented that socio-economic status (SES) was also important and related. A very good point. SES intersects with other social constructs such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, and…

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Race and ethnicity: Collecting demographic data in a survey

There are multiple reasons why you might want to collect race/ethnic data on a survey and each of those reasons will have different implications for what you ask and how. In this post, I will clarify the different purposes that might be served by asking about race/ethnicity and provide some suggestions for creating a question…

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Charting imputed, real, and projected data

In a previous post, I discussed the importance of keeping a data agenda: a list of data that will be helpful to your program but is not currently being measured. Once you’ve completed your agenda, you might be thinking, “Now what?” Getting started on charting your data may seem like a daunting task, but there…

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Two kinds of process measures: How much and how well

  When evaluating your programs, you may want to consider two kinds of measures: process measures and outcome measures. Process measures help you assess what you’re doing and how well you’re doing it, and they are evaluated while the program is in progress. Outcome measures evaluate the effect the program has/had on its target population…

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