Charting imputed, real, and projected data

In a previous post, I discussed the importance of keeping a data agenda: a list of data that will be helpful to your program but is not currently being measured. Once you’ve completed your agenda, you might be thinking, “Now what?” Getting started on charting your data may seem like a daunting task, but there…

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Does sustaining your organization go in your logic model?

Every once in a while, I see a logic model that incorporates the organization’s financial sustainability. The rationale for it is that if the organization doesn’t have enough resources, the program won’t run. This is true, but including the activities of your development department in your program logic model reveals a couple of misunderstandings about…

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More useful guides and resources for building logic models

Last year, I published a post with a handful of resources on developing logic models. It’s a new year, and I thought the subject was worth revisiting. This post includes more long-form guides and online courses that you can use to build understanding of logic models in your programs and organizations. Here are four guides…

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Aligning logic models with Targeted Universalism

I have recently been thinking and reading about Targeted Universalism. Originally developed by professor and critical race scholar John A. Powell, Targeted Universalism is an approach to advancing population-level goals that takes into account the experiences and specific needs of diverse sub-populations. Targeted Universalism can be used as a strategy to align multiple organizations to…

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A very brief introduction to evaluation methods: Non-experimental, experimental, and quasi-experimental designs

When you are evaluating a program to see whether it was effective, there are three types of approaches: experimental, non-experimental, and quasi-experimental. The difference between them is that in an experimental design, the researcher determines which participants were in the treatment group (participated in our program) and which were in the control group (did not…

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